Pop Quiz: Do You Understand Acne?

Male ace with acne problem skin isolated on white

Pimples are normally caused by dry skin, whereas blackheads are typically a result of oily skin.

When it comes to treating acne, one product never works for everyone. Choosing products that will help clear up your skin—and that won’t make it worse—depends on knowing your skin type. Products that work for dry skin won’t work for oily skin. Products that work for tight skin won’t work for loose skin. Products that won’t work for resistant skin may make sensitive skin break out, and people who have Asian, African, or Hispanic skin types especially need to know whether their skin is pigmented or non-pigmented.

This skin type acne quiz is divided into four parts to help you determine each of the four attributes of your skin. It is a true-false quiz, but you should go with statements that are more descriptive of you than not, rather than treating each statement as 100% true or 100% false. Each part of the quiz comes with important information about the acne care products that will work—and that will not—for your skin type.

Summary:

  • Different skin types need different acne treatments.
  • This four brief acne quizzes will tell you whether your skin is dry or oily, tight or loose, resistant or sensitive, and pigmented or non-pigmented.
  • Pimples are more of a problem on dry skin.
  • Blackheads are more of a problem on oily skin.
  • Tight skin tends to react badly to “deep cleansing” products.
  • Loose skin tends to wrinkle and loose healthy color.
  • Sensitive skin breaks out when it is treated with acne products that contain certain herbs, botanicals, or fragrances.
  • Resistant skin stands up to harsh cleansers—until severe breakouts occur all at once.
  • People who have non-pigmented skin usually say that the worst thing about acne is pimples.
  • People who have pigmented skin usually say that the worst thing about acne is the brown spots left behind after pimples heal.

Dry Skin vs. Oily Skin

Acne is a condition in which skin oils clog pores, but people who have dry skin can get acne, too. And people who have oily skin can suffer drying of the skin in conditions of low humidity or high heat. This 10-question quiz will help you determine whether you have dry or oily skin or a combination of both, and tell you which products may be most important for you to get rid of acne for good. Answer every question “true” or “false.”

1. If I don’t use moisturizer, my skin tends to look gray or rough several hours after I wash it.
2. I tend to get more tiny pimples than large blackheads.
3. When I use makeup without powder, my foundation tends to clump rather than streak.
4. My face seldom or never looks shiny in photos.
5. My pores tend to be small and unnoticeable.
6. I tend to have dryness around the eyes.
7. Oiliness on my cheeks and nose is seldom a problem.
8. I seldom get whiteheads or blackheads.

If you answer more questions “true” rather than “false,” your skin tends to be dry. If you answer more questions “false” rather than “true,” you skin tends to be oily. Even if you have oily skin, however, you may have to deal with dryness around the eyes, and even if you have dry skin, you may occasionally have oiliness around across the cheeks and on the nose.

Dry skin needs moisture. If you moisturize dry skin, it will easier for your pores to stay open, and you will get fewer pimples.

Oily skin needs gentle cleansing. Big bubbles of detergent or foamy cleansers actually harm oily skin. Anything that makes oily skin feel tingly can trigger a reaction that makes the skin produce even more oil.

Tight Skin vs. Loose Skin

Tight skin tends to strangle pores, trapping oil inside. Loose skin can be so flexible that it rolls or wrinkles. These questions will help you determine whether you have tight skin or loose skin. Answer each statement with “true” or “false.”

1. My face doesn’t wrinkle even when I laugh or frown.
2. My face always wrinkles even when I’m still.
3. My parents look (or looked) young for their age.
4. My parents look (or looked) old for their age.
5. I have never intentionally gotten a tan.
6. I always get a summer tan.
7. I never smoke.
8. I smoke one, two, or three packs a day.
9. I eat vegetables every day.
10. I seldom or never eat vegetables.

If statements 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 are more descriptive of you, you probably have tight skin. If statements 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 are more descriptive of you, you probably have loose skin.

If you have tight skin, you need to pay more attention to disinfecting your skin. If you have loose skin, you need to pay more attention to reducing oil production in your skin.

Resistant Skin vs. Sensitive Skin

Resistant skin tends not to become inflamed after exposure to chemicals or allergens or in response to stress. Sensitive skin tends to be inflamed even after limited exposure to chemicals or allergens and in response to stress. These questions will help you determine whether you have resistant skin or sensitive skin. Answer each statement with “true” or “false” depending on whether the statement is more true or more false in describing you.

1. My neck turns red when I get angry or upset.
2. I get broken blood vessels on my nose and ears.
3. My face turns red when I drink.
4. My face turns red when I eat spicy food.
5. I have been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, eczema, or allergies.
6. Someone in my family has been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, eczema, or allergies.
7. Bubble bath makes me feel itchy or makes my skin break out.
8. Sunscreen and sunblock make my face break out or feel itchy or turn red.
9. Scented soaps make me break out.
10. Products that leave my face feeling tingly also make it break out.

If most of these statements are more descriptive of you than not, you have sensitive skin. If most of these statements do not apply to you, you have resistant skin.

Resistant skin can stand up to cleansers, botanicals, essential oils, and perfumes. Sensitive skin breaks out when it is treated with skin care products that contain these ingredients.

Pigmented Skin vs. Non-Pigmented Skin

If you have non-pigmented or fair skin, probably the worst part of your experience with acne is pimples. If you have pigmented Asian, brown, or African skin, probably the worst part of your experience is the brown spots left when pimples heal.

There are many ways to prevent spotting of the skin, but you need to be aware of them before the spots form, not after. Answer each of these questions with “true” or “false,” depending whether it is mostly applicable or mostly not applicable to you.

1. When I get a pimple or an ingrown hair, it is followed by a black or brown spot.
2. When I get a cut or a scrape, my skin turns brown instead of pink as it heals.
3. I have had lots of freckles on my face or torso.
4. Spots on my skin turn darker when I get sun.
5. My natural hair is (or was, before it started turning gray) black.

If you evaluated more statements as true of you, then you have pigmented skin. You need to take special care to avoid irritation of your skin in your daily skin care and when you are treating acne to avoid permanent discoloration of the skin.

It can be complicated to make the right choices in skin care products if you have an unusual skin type. Exposed Skin Care, however, offers a complete skin care treatment system that takes the guesswork out of acne care, sold with a money-back guarantee.

Summary:

Different skin types need different acne treatments.
This four brief acne quizzes will tell you whether your skin is dry or oily, tight or loose, resistant or sensitive, and pigmented or non-pigmented.
Pimples are more of a problem on dry skin.
Blackheads are more of a problem on oily skin.
Tight skin tends to react badly to “deep cleansing” products.
Loose skin tends to wrinkle and loose healthy color.
Sensitive skin breaks out when it is treated with acne products that contain certain herbs, botanicals, or fragrances.
Resistant skin stands up to harsh cleansers—until severe breakouts occur all at once.
People who have non-pigmented skin usually say that the worst thing about acne is pimples.
People who have pigmented skin usually say that the worst thing about acne is the brown spots left behind after pimples heal.

Dry Skin vs. Oily Skin

Acne is a condition in which skin oils clog pores, but people who have dry skin can get acne, too. And people who have oily skin can suffer drying of the skin in conditions of low humidity or high heat. This 10-question quiz will help you determine whether you have dry or oily skin or a combination of both, and tell you which products may be most important for you to get rid of acne for good. Answer every question “true” or “false.”

1. If I don’t use moisturizer, my skin tends to look gray or rough several hours after I wash it.
2. I tend to get more tiny pimples than large blackheads.
3. When I use makeup without powder, my foundation tends to clump rather than streak.
4. My face seldom or never looks shiny in photos.
5. My pores tend to be small and unnoticeable.
6. I tend to have dryness around the eyes.
7. Oiliness on my cheeks and nose is seldom a problem.
8. I seldom get whiteheads or blackheads.

If you answer more questions “true” rather than “false,” your skin tends to be dry. If you answer more questions “false” rather than “true,” you skin tends to be oily. Even if you have oily skin, however, you may have to deal with dryness around the eyes, and even if you have dry skin, you may occasionally have oiliness around across the cheeks and on the nose.

Dry skin needs moisture. If you moisturize dry skin, it will easier for your pores to stay open, and you will get fewer pimples.

Oily skin needs gentle cleansing. Big bubbles of detergent or foamy cleansers actually harm oily skin. Anything that makes oily skin feel tingly can trigger a reaction that makes the skin produce even more oil.

Tight Skin vs. Loose Skin

Tight skin tends to strangle pores, trapping oil inside. Loose skin can be so flexible that it rolls or wrinkles. These questions will help you determine whether you have tight skin or loose skin. Answer each statement with “true” or “false.”

1. My face doesn’t wrinkle even when I laugh or frown.
2. My face always wrinkles even when I’m still.
3. My parents look (or looked) young for their age.
4. My parents look (or looked) old for their age.
5. I have never intentionally gotten a tan.
6. I always get a summer tan.
7. I never smoke.
8. I smoke one, two, or three packs a day.
9. I eat vegetables every day.
10. I seldom or never eat vegetables.

If statements 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 are more descriptive of you, you probably have tight skin. If statements 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 are more descriptive of you, you probably have loose skin.

If you have tight skin, you need to pay more attention to disinfecting your skin. If you have loose skin, you need to pay more attention to reducing oil production in your skin.

Resistant Skin vs. Sensitive Skin

Resistant skin tends not to become inflamed after exposure to chemicals or allergens or in response to stress. Sensitive skin tends to be inflamed even after limited exposure to chemicals or allergens and in response to stress. These questions will help you determine whether you have resistant skin or sensitive skin. Answer each statement with “true” or “false” depending on whether the statement is more true or more false in describing you.

1. My neck turns red when I get angry or upset.
2. I get broken blood vessels on my nose and ears.
3. My face turns red when I drink.
4. My face turns red when I eat spicy food.
5. I have been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, eczema, or allergies.
6. Someone in my family has been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis, eczema, or allergies.
7. Bubble bath makes me feel itchy or makes my skin break out.
8. Sunscreen and sunblock make my face break out or feel itchy or turn red.
9. Scented soaps make me break out.
10. Products that leave my face feeling tingly also make it break out.

If most of these statements are more descriptive of you than not, you have sensitive skin. If most of these statements do not apply to you, you have resistant skin.

Resistant skin can stand up to cleansers, botanicals, essential oils, and perfumes. Sensitive skin breaks out when it is treated with skin care products that contain these ingredients.

Pigmented Skin vs. Non-Pigmented Skin

If you have non-pigmented or fair skin, probably the worst part of your experience with acne is pimples. If you have pigmented Asian, brown, or African skin, probably the worst part of your experience is the brown spots left when pimples heal.

There are many ways to prevent spotting of the skin, but you need to be aware of them before the spots form, not after. Answer each of these questions with “true” or “false,” depending whether it is mostly applicable or mostly not applicable to you.

1. When I get a pimple or an ingrown hair, it is followed by a black or brown spot.
2. When I get a cut or a scrape, my skin turns brown instead of pink as it heals.
3. I have had lots of freckles on my face or torso.
4. Spots on my skin turn darker when I get sun.
5. My natural hair is (or was, before it started turning gray) black.

If you evaluated more statements as true of you, then you have pigmented skin. You need to take special care to avoid irritation of your skin in your daily skin care and when you are treating acne to avoid permanent discoloration of the skin.

It can be complicated to make the right choices in skin care products if you have an unusual skin type. Exposed Skin Care, however, offers a complete skin care treatment system that takes the guesswork out of acne care, sold with a money-back guarantee.

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