Helping People Achieve Clear Skin Since 2007

Helping People Achieve Clear Skin Since 2007

What Real Curology Reviews Have to Say About This New Acne Treatment

By Dr. Jaggi Rao, MD, FRCPC, Double board-certified dermatologist

If you’ve tried every over-the-counter acne treatment known to man, and your skin still isn’t clear, it might be time to talk to a dermatologist. Dermatologists specialize in conditions affecting the skin, and they can prescribe medications that you can’t get over-the-counter. The only problem is, insurance doesn’t always cover dermatology visits, which can be expensive.

There is an alternative though: Curology.

What Is Curology?

Curology is a telehealth service created by dermatologist David Lortscher that connects people with providers who design a treatment plan for your specific skin problems, which may include breakouts, but could also include other issues like wrinkles and skin texture as well. They create an individualized formula based on a skin type quiz and photos of your current skin, then mail it to your house along with their signature face wash and moisturizer. If you have questions or concerns about how the product is working, or if you want to change your personalized ingredients, you can contact your personalized provider in a variety of ways. If necessary, you can even get prescriptions for oral medications like antibiotics or birth control.

👉 Best of all? It only costs $60 every two months.

In theory, it sounds like a great idea.

Accessible dermatological care, individualized treatment plans, low monthly cost, what’s not to love? But we had a few questions, like what goes in those individualized treatment products? Is your personal provider actually a dermatologist? Is it easy to cancel or get your money back if you have a bad experience?

These are questions everyone should be asking before trying Curology, so we put together a review that addresses all these questions and more, so you can find all the answers you need in one place.

There Is No “Cure” For Acne

Based on their name, you would assume that Curology really can cure acne, but the truth is, there is no “cure” because it’s a longterm condition that requires ongoing, consistent treatment until your skin chemistry changes, most likely in your mid- to late-30s.

Even if a product can’t cure your breakouts forever in a single dose, many people are happy to find a product that consistently reduces their skin problems. So the question is, can Curology really help your skin? Let’s take a look at how Curology compares to one of the top skincare kits on the market right now, Exposed Skin Care.

 
Curology
Basic Kit
Exposed Skin Care
Basic Kit
  • Removes Dead Skin Cells Without Overdrying
    check
  • Removes Excess Oil Without Overdrying
    check
    check
  • Unclogs Pores
    check
    check
  • Reduces Inflammation
    check
    check
  • Kills Acne Bacteria
    check
    check
  • Prevents Dryness and Irritation
    check
    check
  • Regulates Oil Production
    check
    check
  • Clarifies and Balances Skin
    check
  • Normalizes Skin
    check
    check
  • Prevents Future Breakouts
    check
    check
  • Number of Bottles
    3
    4
  • Price (60-Day Supply)
    $60
    $50
  • Guarantee
    No returns accepted.
    30-days on unopened bottles + 1-year performance guarantee. Read our Exposed Skin Care review for details.
Curology
check
check
Removes Dead Skin Cells Without Overdrying
check
check
Removes Excess Oil Without Overdrying
check
check
Unclogs Pores
check
check
Reduces Inflammation
check
check
Kills Acne Bacteria
check
check
Prevents Dryness and Irritation
check
check
Regulates Oil Production
check
check
Clarifies and Balances Skin
check
check
Normalizes Skin
check
check
Prevents Future Breakouts
Number of Bottles
3
Price (60-Day Supply)
$60
Guarantee
No returns accepted.
Basic Kit
Exposed Skin Care
Basic Kit
check
check
Removes Dead Skin Cells Without Overdrying
check
check
Removes Excess Oil Without Overdrying
check
check
Unclogs Pores
check
check
Reduces Inflammation
check
check
Kills Acne Bacteria
check
check
Prevents Dryness and Irritation
check
check
Regulates Oil Production
check
check
Clarifies and Balances Skin
check
check
Normalizes Skin
check
check
Prevents Future Breakouts
Number of Bottles
4
Price (60-Day Supply)
$50
Guarantee
30-days on unopened bottles + 1-year performance guarantee. Read our Exposed Skin Care review for details.

You might look at those results and think Curology actually ranks fairly well for a variety of skin needs, but it’s important to remember that each individualized product is different. Each product is designed to do a few of the things on the list above, but none of them can do them all. It just depends on which ingredients the team at Curology decides to include in your personalized product.

Ingredient Breakdown

Before using Curology, you need to know what ingredients might be used in your individualized product. Below is a breakdown of a few of the most popular Curology ingredients and how they work, whether it’s to prevent breakouts, fade scars, or even out skin tone.

Clindamycin:

This is a popular ingredient in prescription skincare. Antibiotics are commonly prescribed to treat acne because they can kill acne-causing bacteria, which can help get rid of existing pimples and cysts and prevent new ones from forming. Sometimes Curology will prescribe oral antibiotics, but in many cases, they will prescribe topical clindamycin instead, since it is less likely to cause problems with antibiotic resistance1.

Antibiotic resistance is a big problem where bacteria become resistant to antibiotics and can no longer be killed by them.

Because of this issue, dermatologists are supposed to avoid prescribing antibiotics whenever possible, and all antibiotic usage should be limited to a very specific time frame to help prevent antibiotic resistance.

If Curology follows these recommendations, clindamycin will not be a permanent ingredient in your personalized formula. Instead, it is used to reduce the size of the acne-causing bacteria colonies so that other ingredients can more effectively manage them. However, some people notice that their breakouts come back when they stop using clindamycin.

Because of these issues, we generally don’t recommend clindamycin, but some people may find it helpful.

Azelaic Acid:

Azelaic acid is a great acne-fighting ingredient, especially if you have a mixture of pimples, whiteheads, and blackheads, like most of us do. Studies show that azelaic acid can kill acne-causing bacteria2, which helps treat and prevent pimples, but it also reduces the production of keratin, which can help prevent the formation of whiteheads and blackheads as well.

Keratin plays an important role in acne formation in a few ways. First, excess keratin can cause skin cells to clump together, making them more likely to clog pores. That’s why it’s so great that azelaic acid reduces keratin production. Keratin also plays a role in something called hyperkeratinization, a process where excess skin cells are produced at abnormally high rates, which then leads to whiteheads and blackheads because the skin cells have nowhere to go and end up getting clogged in the pore.

Tretinoin:

You may have heard of tretinoin’s heavy-duty cousin, isotretinoin, better known as Accutane. Tretinoin is related to Accutane and works in a similar way, but it has a few key differences you may want to know about. First, tretinoin is a topical medication, not a pill. Second, tretinoin is much milder and comes with significantly reduced side effects. But what is tretinoin, exactly?

It’s a retinoid, a class of medications that are derived from vitamin A. Other retinoids include retinol, adapalene (Differin), and tazarotene (Tazorac). Retinoids basically function as a pace car for your skin cells. If your skin cells are being produced too quickly and not dying fast enough, it can lead to clogged pores as the live cells cling to the sides of your pores, creating whiteheads. Retinoids help by slowing down production. But if your skin cells are being produced too slowly and dying too quickly, they can build up in your pores this way as well, also leading to whiteheads. In this case, retinoids would work to increase the reproduction of skin cells. Their job is to help your skin cells reproduce at the most effective rate3.

Tretinoin works the same way. The biggest problem with tretinoin is the side effects. Although they are much milder compared to Accutane, tretinoin can still cause severe problems, like burning, itching, and stinging, and it can sometimes lighten normal skin color, which may not be a desired effect for many.

Niacinamide:

The frustrating thing about breakouts is that even after you get rid of them, you’re often left with acne scars or dark spots known as hyperpigmentation. Treating this hyperpigmentation can be tricky, but niacinamide, also known as vitamin B34, is known to help reduce the visibility of acne scars. Plus, niacinamide can also help reduce inflammation, which is vital for clear skin.

Inflammation is when the skin becomes slightly swollen, which can then close up the pores, leading to all kinds of breakouts, from blackheads to cysts. Reducing inflammation is one of the best ways to prevent breakouts from happening, which is often a better skincare plan than just trying to treat pimples after they’ve already formed.

Zinc Pyrithione:

Preventing inflammation can help prevent breakouts, which is why so many ingredients on this list are anti-inflammatory. Zinc pyrithione is no exception. In fact, its main function is to reduce inflammation. Research shows that it is such an effective anti-inflammatory agent, that it is commonly used to treat inflammatory conditions like psoriasis5.

It can also be used to treat certain fungal infections due to its antifungal nature. Even though the vast majority of breakouts are caused by bacteria, some people experience something called fungal acne6, which is caused by a fungus called Malassezia, which zinc pyrithione can kill. If you suspect you may have fungal acne (which is characterized by small, identical whiteheads that resist most normal acne treatments) you may be able to mention it to your Curology support team and see if they add zinc pyrithione to your formula.

Tranexamic Acid

While niacinamide can be used to treat the dark spots, tranexamic acid is often used to try and prevent those dark spots from forming in the first place. Hyperpigmentation takes place because melanin is involved in the healing process for skin wounds. When healing takes a long time, melanin builds up and that area of the skin is significantly darker when the healing process is over. Therefore, agents that speed up healing can help prevent hyperpigmentation from happening. That’s where tranexamic acid comes in.

Tranexamic acid is an antifibrinolytic agent, meaning it promotes blood clots 🩸. Studies have shown that these agents, and tranexamic acid specifically, help speed up the healing process7.

Metronidazole:

If most of your breakouts are pimples rather than whiteheads or blackheads, your main problem is acne-causing bacteria. A very popular and effective ingredient for killing these bacteria is benzoyl peroxide, but there are other options, like metronidazole. Metronidazole is another antibiotic, like clindamycin, and it comes with many of the same problems, like antibiotic resistance. However, metronidazole also helps reduce inflammation, which is essential for proper treatment.

As we said before, this might be a helpful ingredient to include in your formula for a short time, but it should not be a long-term ingredient, since that will definitely contribute to antibiotic resistance.

You Might Not Work With a Dermatologist While Using Curology

As you can see, Curology uses some pretty powerful ingredients, and without proper supervision, they can cause some big problems, from nasty side effects to antibiotic resistance. That’s why it’s so important to have a dermatologist oversee your skincare.

Unfortunately, that’s not always the case with Curology.

According to their website at support.curology.com, members may be matched to a board-certified dermatologist, but they could be matched with one of their many physician assistants or nurse practitioners instead. These professions are no less important than that of a dermatologist, and in many cases, these providers are just as knowledgeable, but when it comes to your skin, you need a provider you trust. Telehealth already makes that difficult, since you never meet face-to-face, so it doesn’t help that you aren’t guaranteed to get paired up with a dermatologist while using Curology.

Curology and Insurance

If you’re trying out Curology UK (called Dermatica), then you don’t need to worry about insurance, but if you’re in the United States, you may be wondering if your health insurance will help cover the cost of Curology.

Unfortunately, according to support.curology.com, Curology does not accept insurance, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you have to pay for it completely out-of-pocket.

If you have a Health Savings Account (HSA) or Flexible Spending Account (FSA) associated with your health insurance plan, Curology may be a covered expense. Reach out to your health insurance provider to find out.

Returns, Customer Service, and The $5 Free Trial

Curology actually has a decent reputation for customer service. Despite not being accredited by the Better Business Bureau (BBB), which is usually a red flag, they do have an A+ rating from the BBB, which is a reflection of the BBB’s opinion of Curology as a company based on customer service interactions. Also, unlike many popular skincare subscription services, Curology appears to be relatively easy to cancel without too much hassle. Just make sure you cancel at least 2 full business days before your subscription is set to renew, because if it does ship, you’re out of luck as Curology doesn’t do returns.

That’s right, they don’t do returns at all. 🤯

This is very unusual, and it makes us think that Curology doesn’t totally believe in their own product. After all, why would you make your customer keep and pay for a product that doesn’t work? Especially since it’s customizable. If everything about Curology’s customer service was on the up-and-up, we feel it would make more sense for the team to listen to your complaints, accept your return, and send you a new formula with better ingredients as a free replacement. But that is not what Curology does, so be cautious.

We also advise caution when it comes to Curology’s $5 free trial. A big part of Curology’s marketing is that for 5 bucks shipping and handling, you can try Curology for a month and see how well it works. In theory, this trial will show you how amazing the product is and you’ll continue to order it for the full cost every month. In reality, the product may not work for you, and if it doesn’t, you have to be careful to cancel your trial before you’re charged full-price for the next month.

What the 1-Star Reviews Have to Say

One of the best ways to figure out how well a product really works is to check out the 1-star reviews instead of the 5-star ones. Good reviews can tell you what the product does well, but bad reviews can tell you its pitfalls, and that’s actually more important to know. We know there are a million different Curology reviews online, so we’ve gone through 51 1-star reviews from Reviews.io, Trust Pilot, and Influenster and found the three main complaints about Curology: ineffectiveness, intolerable purging period, and bad customer service.

 
45.1%
Made skin worse
33.33%
Issues with Curology’s customer service
21.57%
Did absolutely nothing for their skin

Out of the 51 1-star reviews we looked at, 11 people said the product did absolutely nothing for their skin. Some people only had the patience to try something that wasn’t working for 2 weeks, but others stuck to the regimen religiously for 6 months, and still saw absolutely no difference.

Others noticed a difference, but it wasn’t good. 23 out of 51 reviewers said that Curology actually made their skin worse. Although new products often go through a “purging period” where they draw excess oil and dead skin cells toward the surface of the skin where they can actually make your skin worse at first, but better in the long run, it seems that Curology’s purging period is particularly terrible, and for some, it never seemed to go away.

Finally, despite their A+ rating from the BBB, many people had issues with Curology’s customer service. 17 out of 51 people had issues with everything from billing to shipping to getting in contact with their provider.

Real 1-Star Reviews

Cystic Acne
one star rating 1 out of 5 stars

I started it with maybe 5 regular zits and one or two cystic pustules.. when I quit using it at week 8 it had made it worse! My entire jawline & cheeks where covered, and it was all cystic and painful! I asked my provider Jamie, to change formula and her response was this is normal, keep pushing through 😳 I really don’t think so. I’ve never had cystic acne til I turned 34, and since using curology that’s all I get now!

4 Months and Nothing
one star rating 1 out of 5 stars

This product did nothing for my skin as s personal experience I try it for 4 months it was a money waisted I don’t recommend this .But each skin respond differently to one product

Do Not Buy This!
one star rating 1 out of 5 stars

UGH! I heard so many great things about the curology kit that is literally fit for what your concerns on your skin are. So I bought this hoping for something extraordinary but NO let me say that this caused my skin to break out twice as bad as it already was. Do not buy this!

Whatt happened?!!
one star rating 1 out of 5 stars

I already ordered my curology bottle last month but hasn’t received it. I’ve waited patiently thinking that maybe they were going to send it late due to the COVID-19 but no I’ve waited almost a month and when I try to talk to a agent it won’t let me login to my account 💀!!

Did not work for me
one star rating 1 out of 5 stars

Did not work for me. My acne was not that bad, but now my lower cheeks breaks out and has all these little bumps. I didn’t have this before I used Curology. I wish I never tried this product.

There Is A Better Way

Even though a relatively inexpensive telehealth service for your skin sounds like a good idea, it turns out there are a lot of problems with Curology. Our advice? Try something that actually works. Try products that have a 30-day return policy and a year-long money-back guarantee. Try a company that believes in its products and treats acne breakouts through gentle, consistent change. Try Exposed Skin Care.

Exposed uses a combination of scientific and natural ingredients that are all proven to treat and prevent breakouts. Their products use benzoyl peroxide and tea tree oil to kill acne-causing bacteria without contributing to antibiotic resistance, and they reduce inflammation using green tea extract and passionflower extract. Plus, several of their products include salicylic acid, which is a great way to unclog pores and get rid of stubborn blackheads.

For $50, you can get the Basic Kit which includes a 60-day supply of the Facial Cleanser, Clearing Tonic, Acne Treatment Serum, and Clear Pore Serum. If your skin isn’t where you want it to be one year after purchasing, all you have to do is send back your empty bottles and Exposed will refund you completely.

They believe in their products because they use ingredients that really work.

FAQ

  1. How much does Curology cost? If you just want the individualized product, it costs $20/month. If you want the face cleanser and moisturizer, it costs $60 every 2 months.
  2. Is Curology any good? It seems like it really depends on how much your assigned provider really knows about skincare. The ingredients Curology says they use are actually pretty good, but if they aren’t used correctly, they won’t help your skin at all.
  3. Does Curology make your skin worse before it gets better? Definitely, yes. If you try the trial, expect to have to buy the first 2-month subscription just to see if your skin continues to get worse or if it starts to get better.
  4. How long does it take for Curology to start working? Curology says most people start to see improvement around weeks 3 or 4, though they recommend sticking with the product until week 6 before deciding to call it quits.

Sources:

  1. Bujara, S. Antibiotic resistance in acne: Strategies for prevention and treatment. Dermatology Advisor. October 2, 2017.
  2. Azelaic acid topical. Medline Plus. December 15, 2016.
  3. Brannon, H. What to know about topical retinoids for acne. VeryWell Health. April 6, 2020.
  4. Niacinamide. British Association of Dermatologists.
  5. Gupta, M., et al. Zinc therapy in dermatology: A review. Dermatology Research and Practice. July 10, 2014.
  6. Dawson, T., et al. Broad-spectrum anti-fungal activity of pyrithione zinc and its effect on the causes of dandruff and associated itch. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. March 1, 2004.
  7. Björlin, G., Nilsson, I. The effect of antifibrinolytic agents on wound healing. International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. August 1988.
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